Agro Times
Recent News |  Archives |  Tags |  Newsletter |  Message Board/Forum |  About |  Links |  Subscribe to AgroTimes.com RSS Feed Subscribe


More Articles
Songbird student pilots delay departure and make frequent stopovers during first migrationSongbird student pilots delay departure and make frequent stopovers during first migration

Researchers develop models to study polyelectrolytes, including DNA and RNAResearchers develop models to study polyelectrolytes, including DNA and RNA

Water leads to chemical that gunks up biofuels productionWater leads to chemical that gunks up biofuels production

Conclusive evidence on role of circulating mesenchymal stem cells in organ injuryConclusive evidence on role of circulating mesenchymal stem cells in organ injury

Enabling a new future for cloud computingEnabling a new future for cloud computing

Driving brain rhythm makes mice more sensitive to touchDriving brain rhythm makes mice more sensitive to touch

Paleontologists describe a possible dinosaur nest and young 'babysitter'Paleontologists describe a possible dinosaur nest and young 'babysitter'

Nanodiamonds are foreverNanodiamonds are forever

Parents, listen next time your baby babblesParents, listen next time your baby babbles

Yellowstone supereruption would send ash across North AmericaYellowstone supereruption would send ash across North America

Plug n' play protein crystalsPlug n' play protein crystals

Tilted acoustic tweezers separate cells gentlyTilted acoustic tweezers separate cells gently

Cool moleculesCool molecules

A spectacular landscape of star formationA spectacular landscape of star formation

Study: Earth can sustain more terrestrial plant growth than previously thoughtStudy: Earth can sustain more terrestrial plant growth than previously thought

Evolutionary history of honeybees revealed by genomicsEvolutionary history of honeybees revealed by genomics

Bombarded by explosive waves of information, scientists review new ways to process and analyze Big DataBombarded by explosive waves of information, scientists review new ways to process and analyze Big Data

Key to speed? Elite sprinters are unlike other athletes -- deliver forceful punch to groundKey to speed? Elite sprinters are unlike other athletes -- deliver forceful punch to ground

Abusive leadership infects entire teamAbusive leadership infects entire team

Program earns kudos for improving grades, retaining studentsProgram earns kudos for improving grades, retaining students

Common household chemicals decrease reproduction in mice, study findsCommon household chemicals decrease reproduction in mice, study finds

A self-organizing thousand-robot swarmA self-organizing thousand-robot swarm

Crash-testing rivetsCrash-testing rivets

Scientists discover the miracle of how geckos move, cling to ceilingsScientists discover the miracle of how geckos move, cling to ceilings

Geography matters: Model predicts how local 'shocks' influence U.S. economyGeography matters: Model predicts how local 'shocks' influence U.S. economy

A healthy lifestyle adds years to lifeA healthy lifestyle adds years to life

Strict diet suspends development, doubles lifespan of wormsStrict diet suspends development, doubles lifespan of worms

Identified for the first time what kind of explosive has been used after the detonationIdentified for the first time what kind of explosive has been used after the detonation

Copied from nature: Detecting software errors via genetic algorithmsCopied from nature: Detecting software errors via genetic algorithms

Research develops new lines of cool-season grasses (11/6/2013)

Tags:
breeding, cattle, cultivars, disease, drought, fungus, grass, grasses, grasslands, grazing, perennial grasses, productivity, research, ryegrass, sheep, technology, texas, wheat
Dr. Dariusz Malinowski, a Texas A&M AgriLife Research forage cropping systems scientist in Vernon, explains differences in summer drought survival between summer-dormant and traditional, summer-active cool-season perennial forage grasses. -  Texas A&M AgriLife Research photo by Kay Ledbetter
Dr. Dariusz Malinowski, a Texas A&M AgriLife Research forage cropping systems scientist in Vernon, explains differences in summer drought survival between summer-dormant and traditional, summer-active cool-season perennial forage grasses. - Texas A&M AgriLife Research photo by Kay Ledbetter

Breeding lines of summer-dormant cool-season grasses suited for the Rolling Plains are ready for seed increase after four years of improvement at the Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center near Vernon.

Dr. Dariusz Malinowski, a Texas A&M AgriLife Research forage cropping systems scientist, began work in 2000 with cool-season perennial grasses for the Rolling Plains region in collaboration with Grasslanz Technology Ltd. in New Zealand. In 2009, the collaboration turned its focus to breeding summer-dormant, cool-season grasses.

Malinowski is now ready to send his first Texas breeding lines back to New Zealand for seed increase in 2014 to ensure a high quality seed is available for worldwide evaluation and studies, he said. Final evaluation studies will be conducted in the U.S. and several other countries.

Others who are a part of the research effort are Dr. Bill Pinchak, AgriLife Research ruminant nutritionist; Dr. Yves Emendack, AgriLife Research post-doctoral plant pathologist; and Steve Brown, Texas Foundation Seed Service general manager, all of Vernon. The project is funded by Grasslands Innovation Ltd. of New Zealand.

Early on, AgResearch Grasslands in New Zealand was testing a cultivar eventually released as Fletcha, Malinowski said. He was working with Pinchak at the time on wheat grasses "and we didn't have too much luck because they only lasted for one or two seasons. When we saw the Fletcha growing here, we began working with AgResearch and they sent us more lines."

The group is trying to find forages to fill the grazing niche needed during October to December, a time when cattlemen are waiting for wheat to grow in the fall for forage, and again from March through May if wheat is produced for grain, Malinowski said.

"Our major goal has been to develop cultivars of summer-dormant tall fescue, orchard grass and perennial ryegrass with superior persistence, forage productivity and disease resistance, and tolerance to drought and high temperatures in summer," he said.

"Our previous, long-term (10 years) studies have shown that summer-dormant, cool-season perennial grasses are perfectly adapted to the environments of the Southern Great Plains and incomparably more resistant to summer drought than other introduced cool-season perennial forage grasses."

The project now has three tall fescue and three orchard grass breeding lines in the final stages of cultivar development. In addition, two synthetic lines of perennial ryegrass with exceptional tolerance to high temperatures are being developed and are ready for final selection in New Zealand, he said.

Malinowski said once the nucleus seed is increased in New Zealand, it will take about three years to evaluate the cultivars in the U.S. and other countries before the seed will be available to producers.

The tall fescue and orchard grass base populations are owned by AgriLife Research, while the ryegrass base populations originate from the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Germplasm Resources Information Network, he said.

The three lines of tall fescue being developed and evaluated are bred with different uses in mind, Malinowski said. One will be suitable for grazing by cattle or horses, another by sheep and the third will contain a friendly endophyte. Endophyte is a fungus in the plant that may improve the ability to tolerate abiotic stresses such as drought, as well as improve resistance to insect pressure.

In the orchard grass trials, the three lines also are bred for different uses, he said. For example, they differ in maturity, plant structure and tillering rate for grazing by cattle or sheep.

The two synthetic lines of ryegrass being developed are based on three accessions from the Mediterranean Basin, with one being an early maturing line and the other, late maturing, Malinowski said. The pre-nucleus seed of the early maturing selection will be produced at Vernon next year, while the nucleus seed of the late-maturing selection will be further increased in New Zealand.

Note: This story has been adapted from a news release issued by the Texas A&M AgriLife Communications

Post Comments:

Search
New Articles
Sheepdogs use simple rules to herd sheep

Core mechanism for root growth identifiedCore mechanism for root growth identified

Researchers find boron facilitates stem cell growth and development in cornResearchers find boron facilitates stem cell growth and development in corn

Effort to confront Africa's soil health crisis helps millions of farmers triple yields

Ice cream goes Southern, okra extracts may increase shelf-life

Hot-spring bacteria reveal ability to use far-red light for photosynthesisHot-spring bacteria reveal ability to use far-red light for photosynthesis

How steroid hormones enable plants to growHow steroid hormones enable plants to grow

Plants may use newly discovered language to communicate, scientist discoversPlants may use newly discovered language to communicate, scientist discovers

Statistical model predicts performance of hybrid riceStatistical model predicts performance of hybrid rice

Genetically engineered fruit flies could save cropsGenetically engineered fruit flies could save crops

Making cashews safer for those with allergies

Wine symposium explores everything you wanted to know about the mighty grape (video)Wine symposium explores everything you wanted to know about the mighty grape (video)

Elderly with depression, mild cognitive impairment more vulnerable to accelerated brain aging

Wild sheep show benefits of putting up with parasitesWild sheep show benefits of putting up with parasites

Farm manager plays leading role in postharvest lossFarm manager plays leading role in postharvest loss



Archives
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009


Science Friends
Astronomy News
Sports Tech
Biology News
Biomimicry Science
Cognitive Research
Chemistry News
Tissue Engineering
Cancer Research
Cybernetics Research
Electonics Research
Fossil News
Forensics Report
Genetic Archaeology
Genetics News
Geology News
Microbiology Research
Nanotech News
Physics News
Parenting News


  Archives |  Submit News |  Advertise With Us |  Contact Us |  Links
Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. All contents © 2000 - 2015 Web Doodle, LLC. All rights reserved.